Taynish: gold dust!

By Caroline Anderson

This blog covers two visits to Taynish over the course of a week.  The first visit was filled with delight as there was a nice selection of damselflies out, and one or two four-spotted chasers.  I was thrilled, as it had been SO cold this May!

Only a handful of butterflies around but managed to capture this Speckled Wood.   After a holiday weekend of hot weather there should be more butterflies for you to spot – lots of Orange Tips and Small Heaths – these are indeed very small but what they lack in stature they make up for in beauty.  You can get an idea of scale from this dandelion clock. 

One interesting discovery I made as I was rummaging about in the bog at the boardwalk, was this Longhorn Moth – I’ve only ever seen one before and it was during the previous week.   It’s a beautiful gold colour with the most extraordinary antennae.

The bluebells are stunning at the moment, and the air is heavy with their scent.  They are also a great attraction for the pollinator insects – though sometimes you just have to look quite hard for them. This is a scorpion fly making the most of the bluebell cover.

Unfortunately, there was a distinct lack of bees during both visits, I think everything is just a bit later in getting going this year because of the recent low temperatures.   But finally on the pink next to the shore there were one or two getting covered in the gold stuff.  

There was also this wee guy making the most of the pollen – absolutely lathered in it! 

Talking of the gold stuff – check this out!  There’s lots of this type of grass in flower just now – and if you give it a shake you can see the pollen flying out – no wonder my nose is running! 

However, despite the lack of bees during my visits, there is hope, thanks to Heather and Gordon!  

Heather and Gordon, who keep Taynish so special for us all, made some bee houses for our Taynish Trail, and these are now being occupied. If you are considering a bee house, please follow this guidance to assure bees’ health.

The red mason solitary bees pictured below were busily going in and out of the hotel and were an absolute joy to watch.  The holes the bees have been using have been marked to make observation less tricky (that’s what the black dots are next to some of the holes) this also makes photographing them much easier too! 

It’s Garden for Wildlife Week so why not give our pollinators a wee helping hand. Good luck and tag @scotpollinators know how you get on by posting pictures on twitter.